Bird Watching Activities For Kids

 

Giving your kids something to do in the school holidays doesn’t have to be costly. And keeping them entertained for free using the great outdoors is not just cost effective, but also educational. Teaching your kids about nature is an important job, and children are usually fascinated with finding out more about the wildlife that they see day to day. The activities below are great fun, and will increase your children’s knowledge about birds and the environment that they live in. Plus, you might find that you learn something too!

 

Nest Building

A great free activity to get your kids involved in is nest building. Birds sometimes need a helping hand when it comes to nest building. Children can become involved in this process, teaching them about how birds build their nests and why they may face problems doing so. By supplying birds with the materials they need, they are also giving the baby birds a great start in life. Give your kids a mesh bag and ask them to fill it with the kinds of materials that birds would love to make themselves comfy in – this can include dried grass, assorted lengths of old wool and string, stuffing from old pillows or furniture and even the hair from your hairbrush. Hang this bag somewhere in your garden where birds will have easy access to it and get your children to watch as the birds come and collect materials from it to build their nests with. You can even head out around your neighborhood looking for any nests that might have your materials in them.

 

Finding Feathers

This is another activity that will cost you nothing to keep your kids amused. Head off into the outdoors with your kids and search for feathers – you might find them more easily in piles of natural debris such as leaves or rocks. Make a collection of feathers in a paper bag. Once you get home, see if you can identify which bird each of the feathers comes from. You can teach your children about where each bird lives, and ask them why they think that bird was found in the particular areas that you found the feathers. Your children could keep notes about the things they have discovered about each feather and then make a scrapbook of their favourites feathers, including their notes.

 

Birds In Flight

Get your children to find out how long the average bird takes to get into the air. Armed with a stopwatch and a notepad and pen, get your children to start the stopwatch the instant they see a bird taking off. Get them to stop the stopwatch when the bird reaches the sky and is in mid flight. Record these times in a notepad, with a note of the species of bird. Compare the times of different birds and find out who is the fastest at taking off!

 

Why not get your children involved in the kitchen and create a treat. These birds nest cakes are easy to make, and most importantly fun for kids to help make and eat.

No Bake Chocolate Birds Nests

Ingredients: 225g (8oz) milk chocolate

50g (2oz) butter

2 tablespoons of golden syrup

100g (4oz) cornflakes

1 packet of chocolate mini eggs

  • Break the chocolate up into pieces and place in a large saucepan. Melt the chocolate slowly, adding the butter and golden syrup. Stir gently until all ingredients have melted.
  • Remove the pan from the heat and add the cornflakes to the melted mixture, ensuring that all the cornflakes are coated in chocolate but being careful not to crush the cereal.
  • Put a spoonful of the combined ingredients into paper cases laid out on a baking tray. The mixture should make approximately ten cakes. Press down gently with the back of a teaspoon to create a gap in the centre of the cakes. Arrange a few mini eggs in this gap.
  • Place the cakes in the fridge for around an hour, or until the chocolate has set.

 

Author Bio:

Written by Lynne Dickson, Marketing Manager at Wild Bird Feeders. Wild Bird Feeders is the global leader in garden bird feeders and wild bird feeding. For more information about birds and the comapamies products, please visit www.wildbirdfeeders.co.uk

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